Last week I went to London for a music conference. It was good but it was as always the meetings outside that made the most impression on me. Two of them involved a discussion about new music genres.

One afternoon I had a coffee with Stu Lambert who is a lecture at University of Westminster. We concluded that the process of developing new genres have stagnated. Partly as a joke but somewhat serious we reasoned that we might be too happy nowadays for creating fundamental changes in how music is created. We laughed and agreed that we need a deep recession, a totalitarian government and new drugs for the invention of new music genres to take place.

Fortunately it doesn’t have to get that destructive. The same evening I attended an informal meeting and bowling game (I contributed with 2 strikes in 2 attempts) and met with the founder of a new music genre! - RjDj.

RjDj is an application for iPhone and iPod Touch that is using the sounds that is surrounding you (with the mic) and the way you move (with the sensor). The application then transform this information into music thru different scenes (songs). It’s amazingly fun to play around with and a great way to turn disturbing noise into lovely music.

RjDj is promoting a music genre that we call “reactive”. The sound that listeners hear is produced by digital devices in the very moment it is listened to. Composers of reactive music often make heavy use of sensory input, which makes the environment of the listener part of the music that is heard. Compositions are called “Scenes”. Scenes have a different musical structure than traditional compositions and they often have no clear beginning and end. Some scenes promote active listener involvement and others promote passive listening.

The application is, to sum things up, very addictive.

The listening experience of RjDj is similar to the effects of drugs. Drugs affect our sensory perception, so does RjDj. RjDj is a digital drug which causes mind twisting hearing sensation.

Try the free single out or watch this video.

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